The common saying, “every penny counts” is very true – especially when it comes to saving money on everyday items such as food, household necessities and home entertainment and services. Here are some easy ways to keep your daily spending low while watching your bank balance grow.

Plan it out

A trip to the grocery store without a plan of action is sure to keep your fridge overflowing and your bank account dry. Before leaving home, take an inventory of what you have, what you need and what you can go without until your next shop. A monthly food budget and weekly meal menu can help guide you down the aisles of the supermarket, keeping unnecessary products from finding their way into your cart. Brainstorm with your family to ensure shopping lists will be enjoyed and not wasted. Ingredients such as herbs are used sparsely in home cooking but can cost a lot, so try setting up an herb garden in your home. Visit store websites and flyers for weekly specials and coupons and only purchase sale items that you need – if you don’t need it, then it’s not a bargain.

How to slash costs on everyday items and watch your bank balance grow
Stock up

Buying in bulk is an easy way to save on household essentials (cleaning products, toiletries, laundry detergent and batteries). Purchasing food in bulk (nuts, pasta, cereal, dried fruit) lets you weigh and pay for what you need instead of a set package volume, and when it comes to trying out new products, you can purchase sample sizes before splurging on a bigger quantity. (An extra feel-good benefit? Bulk foods are easier on the environment because of reduced packaging and waste.)

Pay attention

Hidden charges, automatic bill payments and auto-refresh subscriptions are simple ways for money to fall through the cracks. Review your monthly cable and internet bills to confirm you are not paying for services you don’t need. Automatic bill payments are handy ways to avoid late surcharges but can often go by unnoticed without a proper survey of the bill. Contact your service provider on a regular basis to find out about new offers or ways you can cut back to save money.

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